Articles

Author(s): Paul Niebanck

Dear Editor: Elizabeth Boardman’s piece in the March/April issue has given me great joy. Her article, “The Fancy Sunday Hat,” takes me back to my own childhood in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. At age four or five, I learned a song in our Methodist Church Sunday School that has served me well through almost nine decades.

It’s a challenging time for human beings these days. In Meeting and at other times, I ponder that truth, and the song comes to me. I am uplifted, and my hope... Read more.

Author(s): Sakre Kennington Edson

Dear Western Friend: I can't tell you how much it means to me to be able to join Quaker meetings for Sunday worship! As a relatively Isolated Quaker at the Oregon coast, your easy website connection, not only for my home meeting of Eugene Friends, but for many meetings, is such an anticipated delight now on First Days. I look forward to it all week and relish being able to see Friends I haven't been in physical proximity to for years. I also appreciate the Extra! Extra! that comes... Read more.

Author(s): Sister Confianza del Señor

Until a century ago, the term “consumption” referred to the disease we now call tuberculosis (TB). The understanding was that the illness consumed the lungs, which was why people got a persistent cough and eventually coughed up blood. “Consumptive” people were often sent to sanatoriums in the hope of healing and to prevent the spread of the disease to others, but most died. There was no effective medical treatment until the mid-twentieth century. TB is now rare in the United States though it... Read more.

Author(s): Billy Jivetti

[This article is abridged from a longer version, which is at: https://westernfriend.org/media/48-windows-campaign-unabridged]

I grew up in the Kaimosi Friends Church in Kaimosi, a rural town of 10,000 people in Western Kenya.  The Church was an important part of my life. Much of the community participates in this Church. Kaimosi is home to East Africa Yearly Meeting of Friends. Quaker... Read more.

Author(s): Zae Asa Illo

This evening, we were witness to a large community that has grown at Fulton and Larkin streets. There are at least sixty persons currently living at this location.

Photo of tents pitched on sidewalk of downtown San FranciscoLast week, when we shared food at the same location, the... Read more.

Author(s): K.T. Glusac

During my year of spiritual service with Quaker Voluntary Service (QVS), Jesus’s teachings became much more relevant to my life. I began to notice how his message relates to facets of my life that once seemed separate from my spirituality – in particular, my activism. Being introduced to the topic of liberation theology during my time in this program opened up a new window through which I could look at the world.

Living in our QVS house, I found myself halfway across the country from... Read more.

Author(s): Diane D’Angelo

March 2020 was daunting for everyone, but especially for frontline healthcare providers: doctors, nurses, CNAs, social workers, paramedics, and chaplains. In addition to the daily stressors of ever-changing workplace policies, harrowing statistics, and not enough PPE (personal protective equipment), frontline workers in the Rocky Mountain and Southwest Regions have had to contend with the juxtaposition of their usual daily tasks and constant vigilance towards the ever-increasing numbers of... Read more.

Author(s): Joann Renee Boswell

~

slippery memories drape
          sheet-like over furniture,

          create sticky mausoleums
out of half-chewed pencils

and worn-once onesies.
          rosy rearview Past leeches

          Future out of Present, like color
sun-bleached away on the line... Read more.

Author(s): Bill Ashworth

William Penn became a Quaker in 1666, and immediately realized he had a problem. He was a member of the court of King Charles II. As a courtier, he was expected to wear a sword; as a Quaker, he had abjured the sword’s use. What to do? Legend says that he approached George Fox with this conundrum, and Fox cut through it with a simple test: Wear thy sword as long as thou canst.

Eighty years later, in 1746, John Woolman began traveling among Friends in the American Colonies... Read more.

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